Can Cannabis Solve the Opioid Crisis?

By | Cannabis News

Probably not—but it might be part of the solution

Cannabis is deeply misunderstood. It has been hailed as a potential hero in the fight against all ailments, including cancer and the opioid epidemic. It has also been called the devil’s lettuce, with claims that its use will lead to lazinessmadness and even murder. In part, this polarization in beliefs can be explained by the complexity of cannabis. It is not helpful or accurate to think about cannabis as a single substance, but rather as a mixture of over 500 chemicals with varying combinations of dosages.

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Can Cannabis Solve the Opioid Crisis?

Can Cannabis Solve the Opioid Crisis?

The Wired Guide To Cannabis

By | Cannabis News

HUMANITY JUST CAN’T make up its mind about cannabis. For thousands of years, humans have used the stuff as medicine or to travel on spiritual quests. That, though, didn’t quite suit the British, who banned cannabis in colonial India. Then in the 20th century, the United States government declared war on marijuana, and most of the world followed suit.

But today, state after state is calling out the federal government on its absurd claim that weed should be a schedule I drug—an extreme danger with no medical benefits—and should fall in the same category as heroin. Even on the federal level, congressional reps like Elizabeth Warren are fighting to end the criminalization of cannabis use. The fact is, scientists have proven cannabis can treat a range of ills and that it’s actually much safer than alcohol. The twisty-turny journey of cannabis has landed us back at a central truth: It’s actually a powerful medicine that can help treat what ails the human body.

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The Wired Guide To Cannabis

The Wired Guide To Cannabis

CBD 101

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Project CBD has created a beginner’s guide for cannabidiol & cannabis therapeutics to address key questions of CBD users.
A Beginner’s Guide to Cannabidiol & Cannabis Therapeutics

In 2009, a handful of CBD-rich cannabis strains were discovered serendipitously in Northern California, America’s cannabis breadbasket, where certified patients could access medical marijuana legally. Thus began a great laboratory experiment in democracy involving CBD-rich cannabis therapeutics.

The advent of whole plant CBD-rich oil as a grassroots therapeutic option has changed the national conversation about cannabis. It’s no longer a question of whether medical marijuana works—today the key question is how to use cannabis for maximum therapeutic benefit.

But most health professionals have little experience in this area. So Project CBD has created a CBD User’s Manual for patients that addresses key questions about cannabidiol and cannabis therapeutics.

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CBD 101

CBD 101

Cannabis Dosage

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High dose? Low dose? CBD? THC? Optimizing one’s therapeutic use of cannabis may entail some experimentation. In essence, the goal is to administer consistent, measurable doses of a CBD-rich cannabis remedy with as much THC as a person is comfortable with.

Highlights:
Cannabis can be effective therapeutically at a wide range of doses. There’s no standard dosage that’s right for everyone. Here are some do’s and don’ts for dosing cannabis:

The successful use of cannabis as a medicine depends on managing its psychoactive properties. Many people enjoy the cannabis high; others do not. A person’s sensitivity to THC (“The High Causer”) is key to implementing an effective treatment regimen.
One does not need to smoke marijuana or get high to benefit from medical cannabis.
CBD is not psychoactive like THC. High doses of CBD-rich formulations are safe, well tolerated, and sometimes necessary.

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Cannabis Dosage

Cannabis Dosage

Endocannabinoid

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Cannabis has been at the center of one of the most exciting—and underreported—developments in modern science. Research on marijuana’s effects led directly to the discovery of a hitherto unknown biochemical communication system in the human body, the Endocannabinoid System, which plays a crucial role in regulating our physiology, mood, and everyday experience.

The discovery of receptors in the brain that respond pharmacologically to cannabis—and the subsequent identification of endogenous cannabinoid compounds in our own bodies that bind to these receptors—has significantly advanced our understanding of human biology, health, and disease.

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Endocannabinoid

Endocannabinoid

Terpenes

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Most animal studies with cannabidiol utilize synthetic, single-molecule CBD produced by biochemical laboratories for research purposes. In contrast, whole plant extractions typically include CBDTHC, and more than 400 trace compounds. Many of these compounds interact synergistically to create what scientists refer to as an “entourage effect” that magnifies the therapeutic benefits of the plant’s individual components—so that the medicinal impact of the whole plant is greater than the sum of its parts.

It is important to consider the entourage effect (or lack thereof) when extrapolating data based on animal studies: 100 milligrams of synthetic single-molecule CBD is not equivalent to 100 milligrams of a CBD-rich whole plant cannabis extract.

“Cannabis is inherently polypharmaceutical,” Dr. John McPartland notes, “and synergy arises from interactions between its multiple components.”

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Terpenes

Terpenes

Medical Cannabis

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Ailments people commonly use medical Cannabis for:

Arthritis
study of 58 patients using the derivatives of marijuana found they had less arthritis pain and slept better. Another review of studies concluded marijuana may help fight pain-causing inflammation.

Asthma
Studies are contradictory, but some early work suggests it reduced exercise-induced asthma. Other cell studies showed smoking marijuana could dilate human airways, but some patients experienced a tight feeling in their chests and throats. A study in mice found similar results.

Cancer
Animal studies have shown some marijuana extracts may kill certain cancer cells. Other cell studies show it may stop cancer growth, and with mice, THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, improved the impact of radiation on cancer cells. Marijuana can also prevent the nausea that often accompanies chemotherapy treatment used to treat cancer.

Chronic pain
Some animal and small human studies show that cannabinoids can have a “substantial analgesic effect.” People widely used them for pain relief in the 1800s. Some medicines based on cannabis such as Sativex are being tested on multiple sclerosis patients and used to treat cancer pain. The drug has been approved in Canada and in some European countries. In another trial involving 56 human patients, scientists saw a 30% reduction in pain in those who smoked marijuana.

Crohn’s disease
In a small pilot study of 13 patients watched over three months, researchers found inhaled cannabis did improve life for people suffering from ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. It helped ease people’s pain, limited the frequency of diarrhea and helped with weight gain.

Epilepsy
Medical marijuana extract in early trials at the NYU Langone Medical Center showed a 50% reduction in the frequency of certain seizures in children and adults in a study of 213 patients recently.

Glaucoma
Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness. Scientists have looked at THC’s impact on this disease on the optic nerve and found it can lower eye pressure, but it may also lower blood pressure, which could harm the optic nerve due to a reduced blood supply. THC can also help preserve the nerves, a small study found.

Multiple sclerosis
Using marijuana or some of the chemicals in the plant may help prevent muscle spasms, pain, tremors and stiffness, according to early-stage, mostly observational studies involving animals, lab tests and a small number of human patients. The downside — it may impair memory, according to a small study involving 20 patients.

AIDS/HIV
In a human study of 10 HIV-positive marijuana smokers, scientists found people who smoked marijuana ate better, slept better and experienced a better mood. Another small study of 50 people found patients that smoked cannabis saw less neuropathic pain.

Alzheimer’s
Medical marijuana and some of the plant’s chemicals have been used to help Alzheimer’spatients gain weight, and research found that it lessens some of the agitated behavior that patients can exhibit. In one cell study, researchers found it slowed the progress of protein deposits in the brain. Scientists think these proteins may be part of what causes Alzheimer’s, although no one knows what causes the disease.

Ailments people commonly use medical Cannabis for.

Medical Cannabis

Medical Cannabis

Medical Cannabis: Know the facts

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While the drug therapy is becoming more widely available, the science is still not clear on how it may help.

Medical marijuana has been approved in 28 states and the District of Columbia, but researchers are still trying to connect the dots as to how, and if, it works.

“Unfortunately, there are almost no uses of medical marijuana that have been subjected to the kind of rigorous testing you’d want for a pharmaceutical,” says Dr. Kenneth Mukamal, associate professor of medicine at Harvard-affiliated Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. “This does not mean that it has no benefits, but only that the lack of human studies prevents us from being sure if medical marijuana can really help.”

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Medical marijuana: Know the facts

Medical marijuana: Know the facts

Human Endocannabinoid System

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For most of history, the effects of cannabis on the human body were little understood. Then, in the 1990’s, scientists discovered endocannabinoids, the natural cannabis-like molecules produced by the human body. Scientists began to realize cannabis exerted its effects, in part, by mimicking our endocannabinoids. It appears the main function of the endocannabinoid system is to maintain bodily homeostasis—biological harmony in response to changes in the environment.Taxonomic investigation pevealed that the endocannabinoid system is incredibly old, having evolved over 500 million years ago. Moreover, it is present in all vertebrates—mammals, bird, reptiles, amphibians, fish, etc, all produce endocannabinoids!10

 

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Human Endocannabinoid System

Human Endocannabinoid System

Medical Cannabis

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Ailments people commonly use medical Cannabis for.

Arthritis
study of 58 patients using the derivatives of marijuana found they had less arthritis pain and slept better. Another review of studies concluded marijuana may help fight pain-causing inflammation.

Asthma
Studies are contradictory, but some early work suggests it reduced exercise-induced asthma. Other cell studies showed smoking marijuana could dilate human airways, but some patients experienced a tight feeling in their chests and throats. A study in mice found similar results.

Cancer
Animal studies have shown some marijuana extracts may kill certain cancer cells. Other cell studies show it may stop cancer growth, and with mice, THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, improved the impact of radiation on cancer cells. Marijuana can also prevent the nausea that often accompanies chemotherapy treatment used to treat cancer.

Chronic pain
Some animal and small human studies show that cannabinoids can have a “substantial analgesic effect.” People widely used them for pain relief in the 1800s. Some medicines based on cannabis such as Sativex are being tested on multiple sclerosis patients and used to treat cancer pain. The drug has been approved in Canada and in some European countries. In another trial involving 56 human patients, scientists saw a 30% reduction in pain in those who smoked marijuana.

Crohn’s disease
In a small pilot study of 13 patients watched over three months, researchers found inhaled cannabis did improve life for people suffering from ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. It helped ease people’s pain, limited the frequency of diarrhea and helped with weight gain.

Epilepsy
Medical marijuana extract in early trials at the NYU Langone Medical Center showed a 50% reduction in the frequency of certain seizures in children and adults in a study of 213 patients recently.

Glaucoma
Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness. Scientists have looked at THC’s impact on this disease on the optic nerve and found it can lower eye pressure, but it may also lower blood pressure, which could harm the optic nerve due to a reduced blood supply. THC can also help preserve the nerves, a small study found.

Multiple sclerosis
Using marijuana or some of the chemicals in the plant may help prevent muscle spasms, pain, tremors and stiffness, according to early-stage, mostly observational studies involving animals, lab tests and a small number of human patients. The downside — it may impair memory, according to a small study involving 20 patients.

AIDS/HIV
In a human study of 10 HIV-positive marijuana smokers, scientists found people who smoked marijuana ate better, slept better and experienced a better mood. Another small study of 50 people found patients that smoked cannabis saw less neuropathic pain.

Alzheimer’s
Medical marijuana and some of the plant’s chemicals have been used to help Alzheimer’spatients gain weight, and research found that it lessens some of the agitated behavior that patients can exhibit. In one cell study, researchers found it slowed the progress of protein deposits in the brain. Scientists think these proteins may be part of what causes Alzheimer’s, although no one knows what causes the disease.

Cannabis contains over 500 distinct compounds, which include cannabinoids, terpenoids, flavonoids, and omega fatty acids. Terpenoids are responsible for the aroma of cannabis and other flowering plants. Studies have shown terpenoids to have diverse physiologic effects, and terpenoids may be contributing to the observed effects of cannabis. 

Cannabinoids are compounds unique to cannabis, and there have been over 100 different cannabinoids identified. The most well known cannabinoid is delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is responsible for the “high” of cannabis and can affect perception, mood, emotion, cognition, and motor function. But there are also cannabinoids like cannabidiol (CBD) which are non-psychoactive yet have been demonstrated to possess medically useful properties. 7 CBD rose to mainstream attention in 2013 after it was featured in Dr. Sanjay Gupta’s CNN special report “Weed”, which reported on children with severe seizure disorders who anecdotally benefitted from CBD. 

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Cannabis and its Compounds

Cannabis and its Compounds

Medical Marijuana

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There are few subjects that can stir up stronger emotions among doctors, scientists, researchers, policy makers, and the public than medical marijuana. Is it safe? Should it be legal? Decriminalized? Has its effectiveness been proven? What conditions is it useful for? Is it addictive? How do we keep it out of the hands of teenagers? Is it really the “wonder drug” that people claim it is? Is medical marijuana just a ploy to legalize marijuana in general?

These are just a few of the excellent questions around this subject, questions that I am going to studiously avoid so we can focus on two specific areas: why do patients find it useful, and how can they discuss it with their doctor?

Marijuana is currently legal, on the state level, in 29 states, and in Washington, DC. It is still illegal from the federal government’s perspective. The Obama administration did not make prosecuting medical marijuana even a minor priority. President Donald Trump promised not to interfere with people who use medical marijuana, though his administration is currently threatening to reverse this policy. About 85% of Americans support legalizing medical marijuana, and it is estimated that at least several million Americans currently use it.

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Medical marijuana

Medical marijuana

Cannabidiol (CBD) — what we know and what we don’t

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Cannabidiol (CBD) has been recently covered in the media, and you may have even seen it as an add-in booster to your post-workout smoothie or morning coffee. What exactly is CBD? Why is it suddenly so popular?

How is cannabidiol different from marijuana?
CBD stands for cannabidiol. It is the second most prevalent of the active ingredients of cannabis (marijuana). While CBD is an essential component of medical marijuana, it is derived directly from the hemp plant, which is a cousin of the marijuana plant. While CBD is a component of marijuana (one of hundreds), by itself it does not cause a “high.” According to a report from the World Health Organization, “In humans, CBD exhibits no effects indicative of any abuse or dependence potential…. To date, there is no evidence of public health related problems associated with the use of pure CBD.”

Is cannabidiol legal?
CBD is readily obtainable in most parts of the United States, though its exact legal status is in flux. All 50 states have laws legalizing CBD with varying degrees of restriction, and while the federal government still considers CBD in the same class as marijuana, it doesn’t habitually enforce against it. In December 2015, the FDA eased the regulatory requirements to allow researchers to conduct CBD trials. Currently, many people obtain CBD online without a medical cannabis license. The government’s position on CBD is confusing, and depends in part on whether the CBD comes from hemp or marijuana. The legality of CBD is expected to change, as there is currently bipartisan consensus in Congress to make the hemp crop legal which would, for all intents and purposes, make CBD difficult to prohibit.

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Cannabidiol (CBD) — what we know and what we don’t

Cannabidiol (CBD) — what we know and what we don’t

What are the benefits, risks of marijuana use? Experts are just finding out

By | Cannabis News | 3 Comments

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What are the benefits, risks of marijuana use? Experts are just finding out

What are the benefits, risks of marijuana use? Experts are just finding out

Everything We Know About Treating Anxiety With Weed

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Weed can, for some, cause anxiety. This is one of the best-known bits of cannabis lore, and according to psychologist Susan Stoner (yes), who has reviewed the scientific literature on cannabis’s effects on mental health, it’s also one of the most commonly documented adverse effects of using pot or pot-based products.

At the same time, many in the cannabis community believe, weed can also help people to treat or manage their anxiety. Faith in this paradox is so widespread—and anxiety is such a common issue—that research psychologist Carrie Cuttler recently found “it was the number two reason medical cannabis patients reported using cannabis.

 

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Top 12 Foods That Contain Potassium To Alkalize Your pH

Top 12 Foods That Contain Potassium To Alkalize Your pH

Can marijuana really replace prescription opioids for pain? Some get relief but ‘it’s not a home run.’

By | Cannabis News | 2 Comments

Marijuana advocates were overjoyed this week when Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner legalized medical cannabis as a substitute for prescription painkillers. The Marijuana Policy Project called it a “big win” for patients, and officials say it will greatly expand the number of patients, possibly saving lives.

But the new state law raises the question: How effective is cannabis for treating pain? And how well does it work to reduce opioid use and overdose deaths?

The answers, of course, depend on whom you ask, be it doctors, researchers or patients. Some pain physicians love it. Many addiction specialists, not so much. The National Institute on Drug Abuse has decades of research on the negative effects of marijuana, while the Center for Medical Cannabis Research in San Diego has mostly positive reports. And patients have their own preferences.

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What Vegans Study

What Vegans Study

The Importance of Testing Cannabis

By | Cannabis News | One Comment

here are plenty of benefits when it comes to purchasing cannabis from a dispensary. While the list is certainly long, one of the key things that sets a dispensary apart from other sources is the testing that has to be done before they can sell any type of cannabis to customers.

Why is Testing Important?

Cannabis is not unlike other crops in that most people who grow it use pesticides. The processing of cannabis can also involve the use of certain ingredients that could be harmful. So, like everything you decide to consume, it’s important to know what chemicals may be present in it.

Lab testing gives a complete and transparent breakdown of not only what chemicals are found in the cannabis you’re about to buy, but also the true amounts of THC, CBD, and other compounds that will affect how a person reacts to their intake of a particular strand of cannabis.

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The Importance of Testing Cannabis

The Importance of Testing Cannabis

Cannabis 101: What You Need to Know

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Now that it’s fully legal here in California, cannabis is no longer trapped in the dazed and confused stereotypes of yesteryear. Today, marijuana is medicine, and a superior form of it at that, with few long-term side effects and an array of highly specialized products to meet the needs of its diverse consumers.

Online cannabis communities like HelloMD make finding the right product for you easy, whether you’re a Menlo Park mom taking cannabis-infused mints to ease chronic pain or an Oakland-based tech bro using a vape pen to calm your nerves before a big work presentation. Thanks to its informational blog, digital doctors and online store selling a variety of cannabis products, HelloMD is a prime destination for smart cannabis use.

But we get it: Outdated stigmas can be tough to shake—and confusing vocabulary doesn’t help. Curious about marijuana but feel out of the loop? Let’s start with the basics.

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Cannabis 101: What You Need to Know

Cannabis 101: What You Need to Know

Medical marijuana programs lead to fewer drug prescriptions, study finds

By | Portfolio

As the cost of pharmaceutical drugs continues to soar, medical cannabis has helped cut the need for Medicare prescriptions in states where it’s legal.

study published Wednesdayin Health Affairs found a decline in Medicare prescriptions for opioid painkillers and antidepressants in states with legal access to medical marijuana, as well as a drop in spending by Medicare Part D, which covers the cost on prescription medications.

Experts from the University of Georgia examined data from Medicare Part D during a time frame of 2010 to 2013.

Researchers concluded that state medical cannabis programs saved Medicare about $165 million in 2013. The decline would have climbed all the way to $470 million — about half a percent of the program’s total expenditures — if medical marijuana were available nationwide.

 

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Medical marijuana programs lead to fewer drug prescriptions, study finds

Medical marijuana programs lead to fewer drug prescriptions, study finds

Older Americans Are Flocking to Medical Marijuana

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Oils, tinctures and salves — and sometimes old-fashioned buds — are increasingly common in seniors’ homes. Doctors warn that popularity has outstripped scientific evidence.
Shari Horne broke her toes a decade ago, and after surgery, “I have plates and pins and screws in my feet, and they get achy at times,” she said.

So Ms. Horne, 66, applies a salve containing cannabidiol, derived from the cannabis, or marijuana, plant. It eases the pain.

The salve didn’t help when she developed bursitis in her shoulder, but a tincture of cannabidiol mixed with T.H.C., the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, provided relief.

Using a pipe, she also smokes “a few hits” of a cannabis brand called Blue Dream after dinner, because “I think relaxing is healthy for you.”

Many of her neighbors in Laguna Woods, Calif., a community of mostly older adults in Orange County, where she serves on the City Council, have developed similar routines.

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Older Americans Are Flocking to Medical Marijuana

Older Americans Are Flocking to Medical Marijuana

V.A. Shuns Medical Marijuana, Leaving Vets to Improvise

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SANTA CRUZ, Calif. — Some of the local growers along the coast here see it as an act of medical compassion: Donating part of their crop of high-potency medical marijuana to ailing veterans, who line up by the dozens each month in the echoing auditorium of the city’s old veterans’ hall to get a ticket they can exchange for a free bag.

One Vietnam veteran in the line said he was using marijuana-infused oil to treat pancreatic cancer. Another said that smoking cannabis eased the pain from a recent hip replacement better than prescription pills did. Several said that a few puffs temper the anxiety and nightmares of post-traumatic stress disorder.

“I never touched the stuff in Vietnam,” said William Horne, 76, a retired firefighter. “It was only a few years ago I realized how useful it could be.”

The monthly giveaway bags often contain marijuana lotions, pills, candies and hemp oils, as well as potent strains of smokable flower with names like Combat Cookies and Kosher Kush. But the veterans do not get any medical guidance on which product might help with which ailment, how much to use, or how marijuana might interact with other medications.

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V.A. Shuns Medical Marijuana, Leaving Vets to Improvise

V.A. Shuns Medical Marijuana, Leaving Vets to Improvise

Keep Calm and Live in New York City: The Promise of CBD, the Cannabis Chemical That Won’t Get You High

By | Cannabis News | One Comment

One morning, about a month ago, I walked out of my Brooklyn apartment on a quick mission to buy shampoo and ended up having six drops of CBD, the cannabis-based elixir, administered beneath my tongue by a Coloradan named Bodē. Such things are liable to happen in New York City these days. Bodē was in Zoë’s Beauty Products, my local cosmetics store in Greenpoint, talking up a line of CBD tinctures to the women behind the counter. It was obvious from his laid-back vibe, and his R.E.I.-inspired look, that he was not from the area. I might have ignored his pitch, and gone about my business browsing aisles of thirty-dollar conditioner and lilac hand creams, except that CBD—also known as cannabidiol, a nonpsychoactive chemical, found in marijuana and hemp plants, that has become the latest trendy ingredient among the wellness crowd—had been pursuing me around the city like the monster from “It Follows.”

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Keep Calm and Live in New York City: The Promise of CBD, the Cannabis Chemical That Won’t Get You High

Keep Calm and Live in New York City: The Promise of CBD, the Cannabis Chemical That Won’t Get You High

FDA approves first cannabis-based drug

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The US Food and Drug Administration approved a cannabis-based drug for the first time, the agency said Monday.

Epidiolex was recommended for approval by an advisory committee in April, and the agency had until this week to make a decision.
The twice-daily oral solution is approved for use in patients 2 and older to treat two types of epileptic syndromes: Dravet syndrome, a rare genetic dysfunction of the brain that begins in the first year of life, and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, a form of epilepsy with multiple types of seizures that begin in early childhood, usually between 3 and 5.
“This is an important medical advance,” FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb said in a statementMonday. “Because of the adequate and well-controlled clinical studies that supported this approval, prescribers can have confidence in the drug’s uniform strength and consistent delivery.”
The drug is the “first pharmaceutical formulation of highly-purified, plant-based cannabidiol (CBD), a cannabinoid lacking the high associated with marijuana, and the first in a new category of anti-epileptic drugs,” according to a statement Monday from GW Pharmaceuticals, the UK-based biopharmaceutical company that makes Epidiolex.

Let food be thy medicine!

Let food be thy medicine!

CONNECT WITH CANNABIS: Cannabis and cancer

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Could cannabis become a main-stream treatment for cancer?

Attitudes about cannabis are changing, albeit slowly. While recreational use of cannabis will be legal as of tomorrow, there is still an air of ‘taboo’ about this ancient plant. Much of this stems from the fact that it has been illegal in Canada since 1923 and was even classed as a Schedule 1 narcotic in the U.S. (Schedule 2 in Canada). Because of this, the research into the health benefits has not been as widely researched as other plants and herbs.

With shifting attitudes about cannabis, however, that will undoubtedly change as more medical research is conducted into such things as the effects of cannabis as a preventative and treatment for cancer.

Currently, there are relatively few large-scale studies on cannabis and cancer, but there are almost 70 good general studies on the subject. These do not include the hundreds of studies on such things as cannabis and inflammation or oxidative stress for example, both of which are linked to cancer. There are also a number of studies into the effects of cannabis on pain and nausea, major symptoms experienced by cancer patients.

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CONNECT WITH CANNABIS: Cannabis and cancer

CONNECT WITH CANNABIS: Cannabis and cancer

Cannabis, cannabinoids and cancer – the evidence so far

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We review and update this article as new research emerges. The last update was May 2018, where we made edits to the structure of the article to make the introduction and several sections clearer.

Few cancer topics spark as much online debate as cannabis.

The bottom line is that right now there isn’t enough reliable evidence to prove that any form of cannabis can effectively treat cancer in patients. This includes hemp oil, cannabis oil or the active chemicals found within the cannabis plant (cannabinoids) – whether natural or man-made.

Many researchers worldwide are actively investigating cannabinoids, and Cancer Research UK is supporting some of this work. These studies use highly purified chemicals found in the cannabis plant, or lab-made versions of them, and there is genuine interest in these as potential cancer treatments. But this is very different to street-bought cannabis and hemp oil available online or on the high street, for which there is no evidence of any impact on cancer.

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Cannabis, cannabinoids and cancer – the evidence so far

Cannabis, cannabinoids and cancer – the evidence so far

23 Health Benefits of Marijuana

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States around the country — 29 of them, plus Washington DC — have legalized medical marijuana.

The American public largely supports the legalization of medical marijuana. At least 84% of the public believes the drug should be legal for medical uses, and recreational pot usage is less controversial than ever, with at least 61% of Americans in support.

Even though some medical benefits of smoking pot may be overstated by advocates of marijuana legalization, recent research has demonstrated that there are legitimate medical uses for marijuana and strong reasons to continue studying the drug’s medicinal uses.

Even the NIH’s National Institute on Drug Abuse lists medical uses for cannabis.

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23 health benefits of marijuana

23 health benefits of marijuana